Skip to main content

"Gone Girl" Film Review

"Gone Girl" (2014)


A man in a blue shirt standing by a body of water, wispy clouds in the blue sky above. A woman's eyes are superimposed on the sky. Near the bottom of the image there are horizontal distortion error lines.The highly-anticipated film adaptation of Gillian Flynn's best -selling 2012 thriller, 'Gone Girl' is finally here. And it did not disappoint. Directed by David Fincher ('The Social Network, 'The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo'), "Gone Girl" is, in a word,  phenomenal.

Fans of the book will certainly not be disappointed. While the film deviates from the novel in certain places, everything you loved is still there in Flynn's screenplay. The direction is razor-sharp, and the acting is great, as well. Ben Affleck has never been better as Nick Dunne, a man accused of killing his wife, and Rosamund Pike is electrifyingly brilliant as the wife, Amy Elliot Dunne. The supporting players are also quite effective, including Tyler Perry, Neil Patrick Harris, Kim Dickens, and standout Carrie Coon.

Even at two and a half hours, the film does not drag on at all. The twists and turns play out shockingly on the big screen. Without spoiling anything, the twists are some of the best shocks in any movie of the past several years. Sure to be a major player this awards season, Pike gives the type of performance that is soon to become iconic. "Gone Girl" is the must-see movie of 2014.



Opened: October 3, 2014
TimScale: 81/100

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Ranking the "Mission: Impossible" Films Worst to Best

The Mission: Impossible movies, based on the 1966-73 television series, are about Ethan Hunt and the Impossible Mission Force doing something that seems impossible at first, but always ends up being possible. Tom Cruise stars in all the films as Ethan, and other members of the team are Luther (Ving Rhames) and Benji (Simon Pegg). I like the Mission: Impossible movies because each film has a different director and thus each one has their own distinctive feel. Sure, there are a couple of constants (Cruise is in them all, they all are spy/action movies, and they all have people wearing masks - a nod to the TV show), but going into a Mission: Impossible movie you are never quite sure what you are going to get. Sometimes it's a silly fun spy franchise, other times it feels like nothing more than an excuse for Tom Cruise do to some sort of crazy stunt. Since the first film was released in 1996, there have been five movies, with a sixth on the way. Here's how I would rank the movies …

Ranking the Five Best On Screen Portrayals of Hercule Poirot

Before Kenneth Brnagh dons the iconic mustache in the highly-anticpated new adaptation of Murder on the Orient Express (in theatres November 10th), I thought I would take a look back at some of the most famous portryals of Hercule Poirot. Agatha Christie's signature creation, Poirot is peculiar. meticulous, and at times, bombastic and arrogant, but he always solves the case in the end, with the help of his little grey cells. Countless actors have portrayed the Belgian detective on stage, screen, or radio, including Charles Laughton, Austin Trevor, Orson Welles, and Ian Holm. But this list focuses on TV or film adaptations just becuase those are the ones I have seen.


5. Alfred Molina (2001)
Molina played Poirot in the 2001 TV movie version of Murder on the Orient Express. He's a terrific actor, generally, but his Poirot is not distinctive or memorable in any way. The accent is not great, the mustache is not great, and he is not eccentric enough to get away with being rude to peo…

Theater Review: "Waitress"

Theater Review: "Waitress"
Waitress, the new musical opening April 24 at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre, depicts a woman's struggle to leave her abusive husband after she learns she's pregnant and starts an affair with her OBGYN.  While the story, based on Adrienne Shelley's 2007 film, doesn't exactly sound like the perfect musical comedy, the show works surprisingly well, especially considering how much I loathed the movie.
With its book by Jessie Nelson and music and lyrics by Sara Bareilles, Waitress isn't always sure what type of musical it wants to be. The setting, a roadside diner somewhere in the South, suggests a deep-fired, country-tinged show, while the young and racially diverse ensemble seem better suited for a modern show with pop songs, and the score incorporates both styles. The real through line of the piece is its message of female empowerment, represented by Jessie Mueller's Jenna, a waitress with a talent for baking pies, and her journe…