Skip to main content

Ranking the Films of Sofia Coppola

Ranking the Films of Sofia Coppola

 Sofia Coppola may be the daughter of one of the most acclaimed directors of all time, but she has never struggled to imbue her films with her unique vision. A trademark of Coppola's films is that all of her films deal with the theme of celebrity, whether it be local celebrity, fading celebrity, unsought celebrity, the monotony that goes along with celebrity, or the unattainability of celebrity. Other trademarks of a Sofia Coppola film are dreamlike visuals and awesome soundtracks. This is how I'd rank the films of Sofia Coppola:


5. The Virgin Suicides (1999)

Image result for The Virgin Suicides Movie PosterCoppola's first feature film, an adaptation of the novel by Jeffrey Eugenides, is equal parts fascinating and frustrating. It's no spoiler that the film involves suicide, but the reasons for these suicides are never explained, mystifying the small town in which the story is set. Like the audience, the young men that serve as the narrator never find the answers they seek, but I guess that's the point. 




4. Marie Antoinette (2006)

Image result for marie antoinette movie posterStarring Kirsten Dunst as the Queen of France, Marie Antoinette is not ostensibly a "teen film" and yet it might as well be. By essentially not having Dunst's character age past a teenager, Coppola manages to create a sympathetic image of the historical figure. Despite running 22 minutes longer than her next longest film, the film has to appreciated for wonderful costumes and a hilariously anachronistic soundtrack. 



3. The Bling Ring (2013)

Image result for the bling ring posterBased on a Vanity Fair article about a group of fame-hungry teenagers who rob the homes of their favorite celebrities. It's easy to mistake the intentionally vapid characters for a vapid film, but that couldn't be further from what the film actually is. Coppola effortlessly depicts a society in which the lines between fame and notoriety are blurred, without getting preachy. Also Emma Watson is perfect as one of the teenage burglars. 


2. Lost in Translation (2003)



Image result for lost in translation posterCoppola's most successful film,  Lost in Translation, beautifully conveys the feeing of being alone in a city of 13 million people and how meaningful friendship can be. Great performances by Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson help bring the film from an experiment in tone and atmosphere to a comedic, subtle, and bittersweet poem.



1. Somewhere (2011)


Starring Stephen Dorff as an actor trying to reconnect with his daughter, played by Elle Fanning, Somewhere is an excellent film. Rarely do films so expertly depict the experiences of its characters, while at the same time creating such an effective mood which pervades throughout the film. Poignant and sublimely crafted, Somewhere is a brilliant film.  




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

"Marnie" is One of Alfred Hitchcock's Most Underrated Films: Review

Classic Film Review: "Marnie" (1964) If your list of favorite Alfred Hitchcock films does not include Marnie , you need to rethink your list. The 1964 film, adapted from the novel by Winston Graham, finds the Master of Suspense and his collaborators at the top of their game. Bernard Herrman's score is equal parts grand and hypnotic. Edith Head's costumes inform as much of Marnie's character as the script does. The production design is among the best in any Hitchcock film. It's a suspenseful psychodrama that allows Hitchcock to do what he does best. When it was originally released in July 1964, the film received mixed reviews from critics, ending a hot streak for Hitchcock that included North by Northwest, Pyscho, and The Birds . In the years since its initial release, Marnie has rightly become known as one of the films that best define Hitchcock's style. Tippi Hedren plays the titular Marnie, a thief who takes office jobs only to steal money from

Is the New Boomerang Streaming Service for Cartoons Worth It?

      Boomerang , the recently launched streaming service from Turner and Warner Bros, offers a host of classic cartoons from the '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, and '00s that I loved as a kid. I have fond memories of watching Boomerang (the cable channel) as it always had old episodes of Scooby Doo and The Smurfs and without commercials to boot. It was the sister network of Cartoon Network, which had some cartoons I liked, but many that I didn't. But the cable channel known as Boomerang today carries primarily modern cartoons and is advertiser-supported, meaning the classics have been bumped to graveyard time slots or off the schedule completely. The first time I realized that the Boomerang channel of today does not resemble the Boomerang of my childhood is the first time I ever felt old . I mean, it's been less than a decade since I was obsessively collecting everything Scooby Doo I could find. But the past is past us now. I start college next week and no longe

"My Mind Turns Your Life Into Folklore": Why Taylor Swift's "Gold Rush" Is a Song About Songwriting

"My mind turns your life into folklore." That line, from the song "Gold Rush," is the only time the word "folklore" is spoken on either of Taylor Swift's 2020 records, Folklore and Evermore , the latter of which is where the song appears. The presence of the line indicates that "Gold Rush" is a pivotal song not only in Swift's lockdown duology, but in her maturation as a songwriter.  Swift's early albums often drew heavily from her own experiences, with fans and the media scouring her lyrics for clues as to which ex-boyfriend her numerous breakup songs referred. Her tumultuous dating life made as many headlines as her music, in part because it informed so much of the music. The discourse was often ridiculous and reductive, and thankfully, that period of her career is over (Swift has been in a relationship with the actor Joe Alwyn since 2016).  Both of her 2020 albums have their fair share of autobiographical songs, but they also see