Skip to main content

Film Review: "Miss You Already"

Film Review: "Miss You Already" (2015)


There's a scene about midway through Miss You Already in which the best friends played by Toni Collette and Drew Barrymore dance to "Losing My Religion" in the middle of the night, in the rain, in the Yorkshire Moors. In just about any other movie, the moment would feel contrived. But perhaps it's the chemistry between the actors, or perhaps its director Catherine Hardwicke's stylish visuals, but the scene works surprisingly well at portraying a bonding moment between two lifelong friends, despite its gratuitous construction. This is what is odd about Miss You Already; what should be overly formulaic, isn't.


The melodrama, with a script from Morwenna Banks, picks up when Barrymore's Jess gets pregnant and Colette's Milly is diagnosed with breast cancer. Make no mistake: Miss You Already is a "cancer movie," designed to make the audience cry. While there are several drifts into TV-movie territory, Banks' script wisely does not make Milly into a heroic victim. She is selfish, flawed, human. Collette gives a first-rate performance as Milly's
confidence deteriorates with the progression of her disease. Barrymore is endlessly charming in a slightly undercooked role as the sensible Jess. She also performs a vital function, as the film's main source of comedy in a film mostly about cancer. The actresses have great chemistry with each other, and it is entirely believable that these characters have been friends for 30 years based solely on the way Barrymore beams every time Collette makes a crack. 

Dominic Cooper and Paddy Considine are strong as the women's husbands, and Jacqueline Bisset is memorably featured as Milly's actress mother. Hardwicke works through the maudlin clich├ęs with a fast paced approach and breezy soundtrack. For a film as sentimental as this, the authenticity to which friendship, specifically female friendship, is portrayed is a surprise, and a welcome one at that. 


Opened: November 6, 2015
TimScore: 75/100

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Ten Best Films of 2020

2020 was an odd year for movies. Many of the ones scheduled to come out in 2020 were delayed due to movie theaters closures brought on by the pandemic. And many of the ones that did actually come out were released digitally. In 2019, I saw 44 films in a movie theater. In 2020, I saw only 11, all during the first two and a half months of the year. While watching movies at home on my laptop or TV is far from the ideal cinematic experience, I still saw a number of great films. Here are 10 of them.  10. I'm Your Woman  It took a few days after watching this crime drama, directed by Julia Hart, for me to really appreciate the sly magic it worked. Starring Rachel Brosnahan as the wife of a criminal in the 1970s who, after her husband goes missing, learns more about the criminal world in which he lived. It finds a unique perspective on a generic story and upends the tropes of the genre by focusing on the moments that would happen offscreen in a typical crime drama. Available to watch on P

Every Julie London Album Ranked

Last month, for school I had to write a long research paper about 17th century Flemish flower paintings, which was a bit outside my comfort zone. So, I needed writing music and a lot of it. After listening a bit to Amazon Music's playlist "Big Band Christmas", I came across the song "Warm in December" by Julie London. It was a name I'd heard before, but I knew next to nothing about her. But the song was good enough to send me to Wikipedia, where I learned that London released 30 albums in the 14 years between 1955 and 1969. Most of the material she recorded was standards, the kind I spent most of 2020 listening to, so I decided that listening to London's entire discography (in order) would be perfect for writing my paper. Now, the paper's done ( I got an A), and I'm left with many, many thoughts about Julie London.  A film actress before releasing her first album, Julie is Her Name , in 1955, London had a mega-hit single with "Cry Me a River

The Ten Best TV Shows of 2020

Was 2020 an unusually great year for television, or did I just watch more things than I usually do? Probably the latter, but I had an exceptionally hard time choosing just ten shows to spotlight for this list. So, before I get into my picks, here are a few that I wish I could have included as well: I May Destroy You, A Teacher, The Great Pottery Throw Down, Dead to Me, Never Have I Ever, Love Victor, The Masked Singer, Love Life, B Positive  and Search Party.  10. The Undoing (HBO)/Big Sky (ABC) David E. Kelley has had a pretty busy fall, between miniseries The Undoing and his new drama Big Sky . I can't really say whether I find Big Sky to be a particularly good show, but I've seen every episode so far and haven't given up yet. The two shows are actually kind of inverses of each other; one a prestige premium cable miniseries with movie stars that turned out to be pretty pulpy, the other a lowly network show that's slowly letting more and more substance seep in. From