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Review: "Veep" Some New Beginnings

Review: "Veep" Some New Beginnings





"Veep" just keeps getting better. The third season, which premiered April 6 on HBO, features Vice President Selina Meyer running a campaign for President. The campaign plot provides many opportunities for more hilarity."Some New Beginnings" is the perfect example of how good "Veep" can be when its firing on all cylinders.


Julia Louis-Dreyfus is looking at her third Emmy for her role as Selina. Her interacting with the people at the signings is what "Veep" does best. It's very smart and clever. The rest of the cast is at Mike's (Matt Walsh) wedding. The bits at the wedding are cute and fun, and a nice change if pace from the insincere nature of the show.

Other standouts of the cast are Emmy winner Tony Hale, who is as funny as ever, as Gary, my personal favorite character. Anna Chulmsky is hilariously uptight  as Amy, Reid Scott shines as Dan, Walsh and Sufe Bradshaw are perfect in their roles. But it's Kevin Dunn as the President's chief of staff that gives me the most hope that this is going to be the best season of "Veep" yet.

The dialogue is fast and full of details, so multiple viewings of every episode are more than necessary. And most of the time that isn't a problem because "Veep" episodes tend to be better the second or third time around. The jokes are as smart as ever, the cast is as humorous as ever, Selina is as despicable as ever. "Veep" is as good as it will most likely ever be. I wouldn't be surprised if "Veep" wins the Emmy this year. Not surprised at all.




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