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12 Reasons ABC Should Renew "Trophy Wife"

12 Reasons ABC Should Renew "Trophy Wife"


It's no secret that "Trophy Wife" is one of the best new shows to come of this season. It's also no secret that the ratings are unforgivably low. But here are some reasons ABC needs to overlook the numbers and give the show another chance.



1. Critics love it. 

"Trophy Wife" has the best reviews of any ABC comedy series that isn't named "Modern Family". Critics everywhere have been hailing the series as among the best of the new shows to debut this year, and that shouldn't be ignored.

2. The low numbers are not the series' fault.

The reason "TW" hasn't been preforming as well as ABC would have liked, is because of a lack of promotion, terrible and unproven timeslot, and a bad title, not because audiences don't like the show. The week-to-week drops are so minimal that it's proof audiences have not given up on it.

3.  The cast is impressive.

Malin Akerman, Bradley Whitford, Michela Watkins, Marcia Gay Harden, and more make up the series all-star cast. Consistently praised for their chemistry, each performer brings something different to the table, and the combinations are endless.

4. Baliee Madison has a crazy amount of loyal fans.

The young actress has hundreds of thousands of Twitter followers, and young fans that follow her every move. ABC would have to be pretty stupid not to use her to their advantage.

5. The series has a strong social media presence.

Largely due to Madison's immense fan base, the series is ever present on the Internet. Over 65,000 "likes" on Facebook, 10,000 Twitter followers, and new fan accounts springing up every day, you'd think that'd be enough to satisfy ABC's desperate need to be thought of as a hip, youthful network.

6. The fans are vocal, too.

Hashtags like #TrophyWife, #TrophyWifeSeason2, and "#ABCRenewTrophyWife" trend on a regular basis, both when the show airs and at random times during the week. Also, a Change.org petition received over 2,000 signatures from fans begging the network to renew their favorite show.

7.  One word: BERT!

Albert Tsai, the young actor who portrays Bert, the little Chinese kid, has been constantly hailed as the funniest child actor on television. He's drawn attention from several media outlets, and even received a Young Artist Award nomination for the role.

8. Marcia Gay Harden has an Oscar!

Harden won an Academy Award, the most prestigious award in Hollywood, in 2000, and was nominated again in 2004. Why ABC would not want to keep an actor of that caliber on their network is beyond me. The rave reviews she receives on a weekly basis do nothing but boost the profile of the network.

9. ABC owns the series.

The show being owned by ABC is a huge advantage over shows owned by other studios, such "Super Fun Night".

10. It's ABC's own fault for the terrible title.

No ABC executive thought that naming the series "Trophy Wife" would alienate certain key demographics? Didn't they learn their lesson with "Cougar Town".

11. The show would preform much better behind "Modern Family".

Anyone who has watched an episode of "Trophy Wife" has thought 'This would be great paired with Modern Family!" Apparently nobody atABC has come to this realization.

12. Honestly, what else is there?

Of the five new comedies that ABC debuted this year, the only other one with a shot at coming back is "The Goldbergs". With "The Neighbors" future also in jeopardy, renewing "TW" would deem this season a success for the network, which has notoriously struggled with comedy in recent years.






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